Midwest Legendary Radio Stations

These are the big market stations I listened to.  From Chicago to St. Louis, these

were the ones which impressed me in my radio formative years.

KADI (FM) 96.3 St. Louis, Missouri

KADI bumper sticker 1974
KADI, 96.3FM, St. Louis
KADI, 96.3FM, St. Louis

Here are some examples of the promotional material from KADI. Including a large poster for "The Rock of St. Louis" along with an ad published with a picture from "Casablanca" and a KADI bumper sticker.

(pictures from the Doug Quick Collection)

KADI began its history as an easy listening AM/FM combo known as the "KADI-twins."  KADY(AM) and KADI(FM) were owned by local businessman Richard Miller.  Under his ownership, the format changed several times from the late 1960s through the late 1980s.  It was said to be the most successful when it was "progressive rock" during the 1970s.  The station was the first FM station in St. Louis to meet with any kind of rating success during the period.  It was also a great alternative to KSHE which was a bit more "hard" than KADI.  It had a very free-form format which didn't shy away from playing a top 40 song if it fit the criteria for just being a good song.   Artists like Seals and Crofts and America actually fit right in with Uriah Heep and Pink Floyd.  It probably was best described as a "superstars" music format within a progressive presentation. 

Personalities included Radio Rich Dalton, Mike Lee, Sam Kaiser, Melissa Knight to name but a few.  Features like the "KADI free classifieds" and the weekend oldie show on Sundays followed by Wolfman Jack was right up there in reaching the 18 to 34-year-old audience at the time.  

 

KADI tried to also market its logo during the 1970s with key chains, t-shirts, and bumper stickers much like KSHE.  KSHE was probably more successful as it appealed to the "bad boy" demographic who were more likely to display KSHE logoed clothing and bumper stickers(see KSHE below).

Sometime in the late 1970s, KADI suffered a fire that put the station off the air for a time.  It later returned to the airwaves broadcasting from a studio on loan from KSLQ(see below).  KADI was to later transition to an adult contemporary format, tightly formatted music, highly structured during the 1980s. 

During the late 1980s, the call letters were changed to KRJY, Joy 96, and J-96. Eventually, the station would change once again, this time to an oldies format called "Jukebox 96."  Miller eventually sold the station to Heritage where the call letters were changed to KIHT, K-Hits 96, with the Greatest Hits of the '70s.  It was later purchased by Sinclair Broadcast Group (yea, that one) where it went to a classic hits format of the '60s-'80s. Emmis took ownership from 2000 to 2018. It remained KADI (FM) through 1987, before becoming KRJY from 1987 to 1994, playing oldies as "Jukebox 96."  It went back to an adult contemporary format in 1994 as KIHT "Hits" then KNOU from 2015-20. It's now WFUN, 96.3 "Fun for the Lou" and features an R & B format. It's currently owned by Audacy, Inc and it is a sister station to KEZK-FM, KFTK-FM, KMOX(AM), KYKY(FM), and WHHL(AM).

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Here's an aircheck from one of my favorite stations in St. Louis in the mid-'70s with Sam Kaiser.  It was a great progressive alternative to KSHE as well as the typical top 40 stations in the market.  It was a much softer, easier to listen to progressive format.  With the likes of Seals and Crofts, CSN, Gordon Lightfoot, and other superstars of the 70s the station probably appealed to a more mature top 40 audience probably burnt out by the likes of KSLQ(FM) at 98.1 and KXOK(AM) at 630KC.
(YouTube)

From the evening show of January 27, 1974, here's Mike Lee the most "laid-back" DJ I've ever heard.  "The Rock of St.  Louis" has a mellower sound than that of KSHE.

(YouTube)

This is a once-great radio station reduced to a shell, thanks to consultants.  It's obvious.  Sure, there's nothing wrong with the way it sounded here in 1986, but the free-form style which attracted me was totally gone.  Maybe it was the 80's music....it's no wonder it didn't work.  Here's KADI(FM) from June 11, 1986.

(YouTube)

By 1977, KADI began to suffer from a lack of direction. Was it an album-oriented station, a soft rocker, or an oldie station? Sunday's programming included the syndicated Wolfman Jack Show heard here, followed by a local oldie show. There's also a promo for a Saturday evening oldie show as well.

(YouTube)

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Sources:

St. Louis Media History Foundation

St. Louis Flashback/YouTube Channel

Pictures and music survey's from Pinterest

YouTube contributors
Wikipedia

 
 

KSHE (FM) 94.7 Crestwood, Missouri

KSHE, 94.7FM, St. Louis
KSHE, 94.7FM, St. Louis
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Pictures of staff above, studios right, and artwork above were collected from Pinterest. If they belong to you, let me know via e-mail response on the home page and I'll give you photo credit.

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KSHE began broadcasting from a basement of a house in Crestwood during the mid-1960s.  It featured a MOR format which was designed to appeal to females.  That's where to call letters came from....K-SHE.

In the late 1960s, the station began to swing its format to what was called "underground rock" or "progressive rock."  In an effort to appeal to those, particularly male members of the audience, who were not fans of the top 40 formats of KIRL and KXOK, KSHE chose an album-oriented format in which artists who were virtually unknown were featured.  The format was guided by Ron Elz, who was one of at least several people who played the KXOK franchise jock "Johnny Rabbitt.  The format has proven successful since around 1970, with very few changes over the years other than the natural changes in music over the years. 

The station wrote the book, or so it seems on media marketing and media branding.  KSHE probably made a fortune selling products with its logo on them.  Keychains to t-shirts, hats bumper stickers....you name it were all sold by the station at various outlets from the malls to Six Flags.  I have seen K-SHE bumper stickers with "Sweet Meat"(the pig) on vehicles from coast to coast.  That's quite a reach!   It is now owned by Emmis Broadcasting.

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This short KSHE aircheck actually covers a large time frame as the station was playing complete album sides.  This is from late January

(YouTube)

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This is a brief history of the first 17 years of KSHE Radio covering the years 1967-1984. This was produced by John Neiman.

(YouTube)

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Pick out a survey by clicking on it, then double click to enlarge, from there just advance by using the arrows

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KSHE's John Ulett at the microphone on August 27, 1980.
(YouTube)

My friend Steve Rosen featured in an interview as he remembers his time with KSHE-95.
(YouTube)

This is just a very short segment with "the world's oldest Rock n Roll DJ" Ruth Hutchinson introducing her show for the night. This was from 1982.
(YouTube)

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Talking with Steve Rosen

August 24, 2022- I had a terrific phone call with Steve Rosen during the afternoon on the date above. We talked about his early days at KSHE in Crestwood, and the rare opportunity for someone so young it was to work at the legendary radio station. He was fortunate enough to spend time at KADI and KSHE in the years from the late 1960s through the mid-1970s.  He worked behind the scenes in television as a technical director and editor. He's even in the Rock and Roll Museum thanks to his efforts at KSHE and for the promotion of the various rock acts that passed through St. Louis during his tenure there!

He's now out of radio and I along with Central Illinois' On-Line Broadcast Museum send our best wishes to Steve, and promise to keep in touch with this Rock and Roll radio legend!

 

KSLQ (FM) 98.1 St. Louis, Missouri

KSLQ, 98.1FM, St. Louis
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KSLQ, 98.1FM, St. Louis

KSLQ promotional material collected over the era. 

 

An "I Q in my car" bumper sticker along with a booklet with the KSLQ top 300 songs from Spring of 1974

 

Plus a listing and schedule of "The Breakfast Serial" an edited series of old radio shows which were part of the morning drive on KSLQ.

(from the Doug Quick Collection)

Originally KSTL-FM was part of the KSTL AM and FM combo.  The original AM station went on the air in 1948 from studios located at the American Hotel at 7th and Market in downtown St. Louis.  The format was called "a wide range of recorded music with no hillbilly numbers or hot jazz....and less Yakety yak."  

In 1960 KSTL had an FM sister station at 98.1 and 76,000 watts.  Both AM and FM were simulcast operations from a transmitter sight in East St. Louis.   Around 1967 the station was sold to Foreground Music, Inc.   It's not known what the format was then, but by the early 1970's the station was sold to Bartell Broadcasting which changed the format to a Top 40 format with a call letter change to KSLQ, or Super-Q.  The studios by then were located in Clayton and under Bartell, the power of the station was increased to 100,000 watts.

 

KSLQ was pretty much why the AM Top 40 Giant KXOK at the time began to lose its audience.  The format was a tight blend of pop top 40 hits and high personality jocks, with great jingles, promotions, and a processed sound which was far and wide better than the AM KXOK.  

By 1979, the appeal of top 40 began to weaken, and the competition of other contemporary stations doing more targeted formats began to take a toll.  In 1979 the station switched to a more lighter format which was billed as "between Rock and a Soft Place."   By 1982 the call letters were changed to KYKY when it was doing a love songs format.  Now it's adult contemporary Y 98FM owned by CBS. 

KSLQ, 98.1 FM St. Louis
KSLQ, 98.1 FM St. Louis

Promotional Card

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KSLQ, 98.1 FM St. Louis
KSLQ, 98.1 FM St. Louis

Feb 8, 1974 music survey

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KSLQ, 98.1 FM St. Louis
KSLQ, 98.1 FM St. Louis

October 10, 1974 music survey

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KSLQ, 98.1 FM St. Louis
KSLQ, 98.1 FM St. Louis

Promotional Card

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The premiere Top 40 CHR FM station in St. Louis.  This one is from December of 1973.  High energy, high personality, jingles, and certainly more "hip" in the early '70s than AM rival KXOK. 
(YouTube)

From 1976 a KSLQ radio montage, a sampling of the sounds of Super-Q from an entire day of broadcasting.
(YouTube)

This aircheck is from August 28, 1980.
(YouTube)

 

KXOK 630AM St. Louis, Missouri

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The History of KXOK begins in 1936 as Elzey Roberts, the publisher of the St. Louis Star-Times newspaper applied for a radio station for St. Louis after purchasing KFRU operating at 630 kHz from Columbia, Missouri. That St. Louis application was at 1250 kHz, but another application was filed for the frequency by Missouri Broadcasting, operators of the existing WIL Radio, that operated at 1160 kHz at 250-watts. Either radio station would be able to increase its power to 1,000 watts to achieve a more regional coverage area from that frequency.

After being challenged by WIL, six months after the application was filed, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Star-Times. On September 20, 1938, KXOK went on the air from the fourth floor of the newspaper's building in downtown St. Louis, and a transmitter site near Venice, Illinois.

By the next year KXOK would apply for the frequency of sister station KFRU at 630 kHz, and to move KFRU to 1370 kHz, to operate at 250-watts. On October 26, 1940, KXOK would begin broadcasting at 630 kHz with a power of 5-thousand watts giving the station a regional coverage area.

Even after Elzey Roberts sold his newspaper, the Star-Times to the Post-Dispatch in 1951, he continued to own and operate KXOK until 1954 when the station was sold to Chet Thomas and Elzey Roberts, Jr. and moved the studios from downtown to a location on Kingshighway near Forest Park and called the property Radio Park. In 1960 the station would change hands again, this time to Robert and Todd Storz. Storz Broadcasting quickly changed the station to a Top-40 format to compete with WIL Radio, which had already established itself as St. Louis' leading contemporary music and personality radio station.

Even though WIL had a number of top-flight announcers/DJs, KXOK took St. Louis by storm as the popularity of WIL faded into the 1960s. By 1967, WIL would become a country station.

KXOK in the 1960s had Davey O'Donnell, Peter Martin, Don “Stinky” Shafer, Nick Charles, Keith Morris, Ray Otis, Steven B. Stevens, Bob Shea, Robert R. Lynn, Richard Ward Fatherly, Nick Charles, and Johnny Rabbitt, among others. As the 60s brought us the British Invasion, KXOK became the Midwest Beatles station, as George Harrison's sister lived in St. Louis and she would feed KXOK Beatles releases before anyone else. Johnny Rabbitt, played by Don Pietromonaco, and his sidekick, Bruno J. Grunion. Meanwhile, nighttime jock Johnny Rabbitt became a local celebrity with appearances throughout the city with local charity benefits and commercial appearances.

 

The format was unique, with a barrage of jingles, sound effects, even music accompaniment during newscasts. It was fast, furious with live commercials, voice effects, and prerecorded promotional announcements. The station staff participated in benefit basketball games as the KXOK All-Stars throughout most of the 60s and played school faculty throughout the listening area. I remember seeing them when I was in the 8th grade when the All-Stars played the Taylorville High School faculty.
 

From the early to late 1960s KXOK became the leader among the young radio listeners, while KMOX remained the station for the older generation. In fact, KXOK was one of the top independent radio stations in the country with a regional signal that attracted listeners across much of the mid-Mississippi River Valley and into the Midwest.

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This ad was from April 30, 1957, from the St. Louis Post Dispatch. Found on Penterest

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KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
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KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
KXOK, 630am, St. Louis
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Pick out a survey by clicking on it, then double click to enlarge, from there just advance by using the arrows

This is the KXOK Radio Story by Richard Ward Fatherly, KXOK Radio St. Louis, Missouri. This video features The Johnny Rabbitt Show. Richard Ward Fatherly was KXOK's production director, and he often did substitute work by doing DJ shifts on the air.
(YouTube)

This 30-minute documentary tells the complete story of how KXOK became one of St. Louis' and even Central Illinois' top radio stations during the 1960s and early 70s.  Produced by Frank Absher, the definitive historian on St. Louis Broadcasting.
(YouTube)

The 1960s

From the 1960s a collection of KXOK jingles and images. From YouTube and St. Louis Flashback

(YouTube)

1957 Preview
KXOK The New Sound Preview and one of the first format flips to Top-30.

(YouTube)

1961-0203 Peter Martin
(YouTube)

1962-0000 Don Shafer
(YouTube)

1963-0800 Shad O'Shea
(YouTube)

1963-0800 Ray Otis
(YouTube)

1964-1100 Peter Martin
(YouTube)

1965/68 Johnny Rabbitt Show
(YouTube)

1964-1100 Ray Otis

(YouTube)

1965-1967 Ray Otis

(YouTube)

1965-1968 Johnny Rabbitt Show

(YouTube)

1966-0000 William

A. Hopkins 

(YouTube)

1966-Johnny Rabbitt Show-Batman Parody
(YouTube) 

1966-0101 Johnny Rabbitt Show

(YouTube)

1967-0125 Johnny Rabbitt Show

(YouTube)

1968-0700 Johnny Rabbitt Show

(YouTube)

1968-0000 Johnny Rabbitt Show

(YouTube)

1972-1119 Lou Kirby
(YouTube)

1976 KXOK Composite Aircheck
(YouTube)

KXOK jingles from the Golden Age of "The Big 630!"

(YouTube)
 

Sources:

Richie Kennedy/route56.com
St. Louis Media History Foundation

John J. Dunphy/The Telegraph of Alton, Illinois, July 7, 2013

Samantha Byrne Leyte/punkglobe.com

Frank Absher/video: “The Story of KXOK 630 AM Radio”

St. Louis Flashback/YouTube Channel

Pictures and music survey's from Pinterest

YouTube contributors

 

WFYR (FM) 103.5 Chicago, Illinois

This one, I believe is from 1977.  Recorded at Macomb, Ill from Chicago.  WFYR was a 3,000-watt station with an antenna on the Hancock.  This is quite a haul to Macomb and is quite scratchy.  But it is a solid ID.  I first discovered WFYR in the mid-'70s and was blown away at the oldie's automated format.  It was a terrific....great mix of '50s-'60s....and great thematic jingles.  It may have been Drake Chenault, but I can't verify it.  Crank it up, it's not very loud.

WFYR 103.5FM Chicago
WFYR 103.5FM Chicago

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WFYR 103.5FM Chicago
WFYR 103.5FM Chicago

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WFYR 103.5FM Chicago
WFYR 103.5FM Chicago

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WFYR 103.5FM Chicago
WFYR 103.5FM Chicago

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This is from WYFR in Chicago which by 1978 was using the

TM jingle package called "You."   

(from You Tube)

WFYR 103.5 Chicago
WFYR 103.5 Chicago

From November 7, 1975

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WFYR 103.5 Chicago
WFYR 103.5 Chicago

Part 1, From November 7, 1975

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WFYR 103.5 Chicago
WFYR 103.5 Chicago

Part 3,From November 7, 1975

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WFYR 103.5 Chicago
WFYR 103.5 Chicago

From November 7, 1975

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WIL 1340AM St. Louis, Missouri

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When I wrote my book, "Pictures on the Prairie: The First Ten Years of Mid-Illinois Broadcasting" I found it difficult to keep the stories of the central Illinois stations confined to central Illinois. I found many connections to media companies outside the region to other broadcast stations to those in central Illinois. Here is one example of such a connection.

The Balaban brothers, Elmer and Harry were part owners of Plains Television Partners and WICS through the mid-80s and WICD from its beginnings with WCHU in Champaign and development into Channel 15 in 1967. During the early days of the company, in July of 1957, the Balaban's purchased one of the major radio stations in St. Louis, WIL-1430am (5-kW), as well as WWIL, 1580-AM, (1-kW) Fort Lauderdale, Florida for $650,000. The new company called Radio WIL was purchased by Harry and Elmer Balaban along with the Atlantic Brewing Company at one-third each ownership. 

At the time, the Balaban's had interests in WRIT(AM) Milwaukee, WI; WBMG(AM) Birmingham, AL; 50% of WTVO(TV) Rockford, IL; and WICS(TV), Springfield, IL and KFBI(AM), Kansas City, MO.

WIL was one of the exceptions for those stations licensed for cities west of the Mississippi River and began with a "W" instead of a "K."  
KMOX(CBS), KXOK(ABC), KSD(NBC) were big stations during the early 1950s, but WIL was one of the heritage radio stations that adopted a popular music format, great talent with lots of listener interaction. If you've been around awhile you might recognize the names of Gary Owens, Mort Crowley, Ron Lundy, Dan Ingram just to name a few.

Meanwhile, in 1957, KXOK made a change to challenge the popular music format of WIL. Most of the potential big-name talent would begin to bail out from the station moving to major markets soon after. Among those, were people like Dan Ingram and Ron Lundy, who went to WABC in New York and continued there for many years. Mort Crowley went to KXOK for a stint, then on to WLS during the 1960s. Gary Owens continued in radio moving to major markets including Los Angeles, where he would also do many commercial voiceovers and is probably best known as the studio announcer with his hand cupped over his ear, as he would introduce Dan Rowan and Dick Martin on "Rowan and Martins Laugh-In."

That was right before KXOK sold out to Storz Broadcasting. Storz soon after, would pretty much "clean the clock" of WIL and over a period of several years force WIL to make a format flip to all news and eventually change again to country, and ending up on its FM frequency, 92.3.

The Balaban Brothers simply let WIL gradually fall away from being the popular station it was in the late 1950s, leaving it to slowly die in the mid to late 1960s, before being sold. 1430-AM is now considered to be one of St. Louis' dead frequencies with no station assigned to it. 

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WIL, 1380-AM St. Louis
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WIL, 1380-AM St. Louis
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WIL, St. Louis, Missouri - Jack Carney

Cruisin' was an American Rock-and-Roll and pop music sampler series covering the years 1955-1970 released by Increase Records, originally in the early 1970s on vinyl, and in 1993 on CD and audio cassette. The covers were stylized after the works of pop artist Roy Lichtenstein. The series was special in that each album purported to be an authentic roughly 40-minutes recording of a contemporary radio station from that year, complete with contemporary ads, station jingles, and a radio DJ from that era introducing each song, reading out local news, and inviting the listeners to join in competitions.
(YouTube)

1961-undetermined date, Rockin' Robin Scott
This is the earliest real off-air recording of WIL that I can find on YouTube. There probably are others available that are on different audio formats.

(YouTube)

1962-February Ron Lundy

He was one of the major stars of WIL who would follow Dan Ingram to New York and WABC.
(YouTube)

1962-February 28 Bob Osborne
Bob was one of the early midday jocks who probably did double duty in production.

(YouTube)

1962-February 28 Bob Osborne
Bob was one of the early midday jocks who probably did double duty in production.

(YouTube)

1963-January 4 Ron Lundy
A wintertime air check with Ron Lundy.

(YouTube)

1964-Fall  Ron Lundy
Wintertime preparation commercials date this aircheck to the Fall of 1964.

(YouTube)

Sources:

Richie Kennedy/route56.com
St. Louis Media History Foundation

Pictures and music survey's from Pinterest

YouTube contributors

1963-January 4 Ron Lundy
A wintertime air check with Ron Lundy.

(YouTube)

 

WLS 890AM Chicago, Illinois

 

The sound of the station didn't change much, although the music did during the period.  The Beatles and the British invasion changed that and the top 40 charts started to see some of the more popular middle-of-the-road artists were falling off the charts. That also called for a change in the style of the jocks and their presentation.  You'll note that if you review the airchecks below. 

By the late 1960s, it became more of a true Top 40 rock station. The slogans like “Music Radio,” “The Rock of Chicago,” began to re-image the station. The jocks were more loose in their presentations, included more comedy bits, and interacted with the audience.

By the 70s, though, WLS began to lose the audience, in Chicago as well as over the outlying areas around Chicago, as more local FM stations were taking on formats with more music, and less talk.  The music changed as well, as disco gained popularity, it chased the typical WLS listener to stations that didn't play that music genre including classic rock, oldies, and even country.  

During the 80s, it was business as usual early, but by the mid-decade things started to change. There were dayparts that were very different. Steve Dahl and Garry Meier joined WLS (from WLS-FM) in 1984, leaving in 1986. Several talk shows would clutter the schedule throughout the era, leaving music as an after-thought.

It was a gradual decline in audience, as the music played became more eclectic, with songs from Louis Armstrong would be followed by Led Zeppelin, for example. It seemed to me that the station was working to chase away the audience so the station could claim a large audience increase when it eventually went to a talk format. That happened on August 23, 1989. By 1992, the station bottomed out in the ratings.

ABC sold its collection of stations, including WABC and WLS in June of 2007 to Citadel Broadcasting. Citadel was purchased on September 16, 2011.

The station continues with a talk and sports format and has fallen considerably in the market's ratings from its Music Radio days.

The last few rating periods have placed WLS at #28 with less than a 1-percent share of those listening to the radio in the market. The number one station, WBBM-AM has a 5.7 share. 

The early history of WLS can be traced back to when Sears-Roebuck put it on the air in 1924.  By 1930, Sears decided to sell the station to an agricultural publishing company, the Prairie Farmer magazine. 

By March 20, 1960, the Prairie Farmer Magazine signed the final sales agreement, and with the FCC approval, made the new owners of WLS the American Broadcasting Company-Paramount Theaters.

Then, on May 2, 1960, the format would change to what was at the time, a contemporary hit radio with high personality disc jockeys. Within the format, news, weather, information would be presented between the popular music sounds taken from the top-40 charts.

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WLS MUSIC SURVEYS
1960-1981

Thanks to the Radio Timeline (radiotimeline.com) we present links to the WLS Music Surveys from the 1960s to 1981.

WLS 1960's Surveys

WLS 1971      WLS 1972

 

WLS 1973-74

WLS 1975-1981

Pick out a survey by clicking on it, then double click to enlarge, from there just advance by using the arrows. OR, use the links below to find particular editions.

Here is the 2008 WLS "Rewind" Tribute, produced by Art Vuolo that rains during Memorial Day 2008.

(YouTube)

The History of WLS in less than 6-minutes.

(YouTube)

A sponsored film made for Chicago radio station WLS as a promotional tool to sell airtime to advertisers. Includes scenes inside the studio with DJ Clark Weber, footage of the WLS programmer John Rook as he rides the train into the city from the suburbs, and shots of potential radio listeners amongst picturesque views of Chicago.

Studio A profiles John Records Landecker from the late 1970s.  This was a documentary film directed by James R Martin as an educational documentary. It was a top ten finalist American Film Festival.

(YouTube)

WLS Air Checks

Year-Month/Day  Talent Name,

Full Aircheck-with music   Aircheck scoped-edited music

Length of recording in minutes

Push "WLS logo" to go to YouTube Video

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1962-0309 Dick Biondi Full Aircheck :57

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1975-1229 Jeff Davis Aircheck scoped :13

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1962-0502 Part 1 Dick Biondi Aircheck scoped :16

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1975-1231 Oldie Montage with Jeff Davis Aircheck scoped :23

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1962-0502 Part 2 Dick Biondi Aircheck scoped :31

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1976-0000 Composite Fred Winston, Tommy Edwards, Bob Sirott, John Landecker, Steve King, Yvonne Daniels

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1966-undetermined date/Part 1 Art Roberts Aircheck scoped:12

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1976-0000 date undetermined John Landecker Full Aircheck :03

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1966-undetermined date/Part 2 Art Roberts Aircheck scoped :10

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1976-0418 John Landecker Aircheck scoped :40

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1966-0909 Clark Webber  Full Aircheck :45

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1976-1202 Yvonne Daniels Aircheck scoped :17

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1966-0909 Clark Weber Full Aircheck :43

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1977-0618 Yvonne Daniels Full Aircheck 1:00

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1967-0416 Art Roberts Full Aircheck 1:02

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1977-0629 Larry Lujack Aircheck scoped :16

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1967-0800 Ron Riley Aircheck scoped :10

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1977-0831 Larry Lujack Aircheck scoped :11

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1967-0825 Art Roberts Full Aircheck :47 

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1977-1000 (Labeled 1980) Larry Lujack Aircheck scoped :17

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1967-Fall  Ron Riley Aircheck scoped :09

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1969-0102 Ron Riley Full Aircheck :45

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1969-0103 Ron Riley, Dick Harley(news) Aircheck scoped :15

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1970-74 Composite Aircheck Larry Lujack, John Landecker, Charlie Van Dyke, Yvonne Daniels, Bob Sirott, and others  Aircheck scoped :43 

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1971-0503 Larry Lujack Aircheck scoped :28

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1977-0000 John Landecker Aircheck scoped :09

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1979-0831 Larry Lujack Aircheck scoped :10

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1979-0911 Larry Lujack Aircheck scoped :22

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1979-1115 Yvonne Daniels Aircheck scoped :09

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1980-0700 Tommy Edwards Full Aircheck :52

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1971-Spring  News with Lyle Dean :04

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1979-0700 Jeff Davis Aircheck scoped :09

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1971-0600 J.J. Jeffrey Aircheck scoped :13

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1980-0000 date undetermined Larry Lujack, Tommy Edwards(Animal Stories) :06

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1971-0800 Larry Lujack Aircheck scoped :04

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1980-0705 Tommy Edwards- Full Aircheck :50

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1971-1200 Check Buell Aircheck scoped :04

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1982-0100 Larry Lujack, Chris Shebel Aircheck scoped :12

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BLANK

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1982-0104 Larry Lujack, Chris Shebel Aircheck scoped
:20

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1971-76 Fred Winston samples Aircheck scoped :40

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1982-0100 Larry Lujack Aircheck scoped :27

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1972-0129 John Landecker Aircheck scoped :13

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1982-0903 Larry Lujack Aircheck scoped :23

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1972-02-- Fred Winston Aircheck scoped :09

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1982-1200 Brant Miller Aircheck scoped :04

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1972-0000 Fred Winston Aircheck scoped :03

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1982-date undetermined Tommy Edwards (mentioning stereo) :02

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1972-0204 Joel Sebastian Full Aircheck :58

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1983-date undertimed Fred Winston Aircheck scoped :06

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1972-0226 Joel Sebastian Aircheck scoped :31

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1984-0200 Larry Lujack  Aircheck scoped :32

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1972-0401 Chuck Buell Aircheck scoped :10

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1984-0200 Larry Lujack, Tommy Edwards Aircheck :06

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1972-0710 Bill Bailey Aircheck scoped :08

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1984-0400 Chuck Britton Aircheck scoped :06

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1972-1000 Bill Bailey Aircheck scoped :13

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1984-1200 Fred Winston Aircheck scoped :09

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1972-1010 John Landecker Aircheck scoped :12

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1984-0900 Brant Miller Aircheck scoped :08

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1973-0608 Bob Sirott (first day) Aircheck scoped :10

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1985-0115 Fred Winston Aircheck scoped :10

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1973-0300 Charlie Van Dyke Aircheck Scoped :09

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1985-0329 Larry Lujack, Tommy Edwards Animal Stories :06

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1974-0312 John Landecker Aircheck scoped :12

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1989-0704 John Landecker Aircheck scoped :46

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1975-0616 Bob Sirott Aircheck Scoped :11

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1989-0727 Fred Winston Aircheck scoped :11

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1975-undetermined John Landecker Aircheck scoped :03

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BLANK

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1975-0712 Yvonne Daniels Aircheck scoped :21

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BLANK

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BLANK

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1987-0900 Larry Lujack's next to last day, Aircheck scoped :03

Sources:

RadioTimeline.com

Broadcasting-Telecasting Magazine

Pictures and music survey's from Pinterest

YouTube contributors

Wikipedia

Honorable Mention of other Legendary Radio Stations 

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WIRL, 1290am Peoria

WCFL, 1000am Chicago

The histories of these "Honorable Mentions" will be added when more information becomes available.